Liverpool: 0151 224 0500   |   Manchester: 0161 827 4600   |   Email: info@bermans.co.uk   |   Twitter Icon  |  Linkedin Icon
bermans_logo

The Law Commission recommendations

Neil Gouldson

With better days hoped for ahead, we ask what the Law Commission’s recommendations on extending time limits and enlarging Employment Tribunal jurisdiction may mean for employers.

Politically, there may be willingness in future days to recognise the contributions of workers during Covid-19, in a departure from the predominant mindset when the current Government swept into number 10. Certainly, the Prime Minister is one reported to be in reflective mood.

The Law Commission has no power to change the law, but the Government (under protocol) has to respond to the Commission’s report and historically more than two thirds of its recommendations have been implemented.

Continue Reading

Get ready for employment law changes coming in April 2020

adrian_fryer

Adrian Fryer

All employees must be issued with a statement setting out specific terms of their employment within two months of them starting work (known as a Section 1 Statement). Often this information will be part of a lengthier employment contract. From the 6 April 2020 the requirement to issue a Section 1 Statement will extend to workers as well as employees. It must also be issued on day one of the employment and the information it must include is expanding.

If you employ staff or if you have contractors who are deemed to be ‘workers’, it is essential that you review your employment documentation to ensure it is compliant.

Continue Reading

Holiday pay and carry over

adrian_fryer

The European Working Time Directive entitles workers to at least 4 weeks’ holiday per year. Many countries, including the UK, choose to give workers additional holiday entitlement over and above the minimum. The Working Time Regulations 1998 gives UK employees an additional 1.6 weeks of leave per year.

The Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) has looked at whether the right to carry over holiday due to sickness applies only to the 4 week entitlement under the Directive.

 

Continue Reading

Redundancy alternative employment and trial periods

adrian_fryer

A dismissal for redundancy is likely to be unfair unless the employer has considered whether there is suitable alternative employment within the business (or group). If suitable alternative employment is offered, it might be subject to a statutory 4 week trial period if the role, place of work or other terms and conditions are different from the previous job. A statutory trial period starts at the end of the employee’s employment under their old contract or within 4 weeks of it ending.

What happens if a role is deleted in a reorganisation and an employee works in another suitable role for more than four weeks – do they lose the right to a redundancy payment?

Continue Reading

Hangover Days

adrian_fryer

How many working days is your business losing to hangovers? This is particularly relevant after the festive season where Christmas parties and social events often fall on a school night. Did your business suffer a flurry of suspicious tummy bugs during Christmas party season?

Some businesses are choosing to accommodate hangovers in a different way, keen to avoid the extra absence which seems to occur around this time of year.

 

Continue Reading

Whistleblowing

adrian_fryer

A dismissal will be automatically unfair if the main reason for the dismissal is the fact that the employee has ‘blown the whistle’ on malpractice.

The Supreme Court has recently decided that an employer was liable for automatic unfair dismissal even though the decision maker was unaware of the protected disclosures.

Continue Reading

Philosophical belief discrimination

Adrian Fryer

Adrian Fryer

The Equality Act 2010 protects people from discrimination based on their philosophical beliefs. In order to be protected, the belief must be:

  • Genuinely held;
  • Be a belief not an opinion or viewpoint;
  • Concern a weighty or substantial aspect of human life;
  • Have attained a certain level of cogency, seriousness or importance (in a similar way to a religion);
  • And must be worthy of respect in a democratic society.
Continue Reading

Confidentiality agreements

adrian_fryer

Hot on the back of the #MeToo movement, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has published some non-statutory guidance on the use of confidentiality or non-disclosure agreements in discrimination cases. The guidance confirms that confidentiality clauses can be used in employment contracts to protect a business’s confidential information. However, they shouldn’t be used to stop a worker pursuing a discrimination claim in relation to future acts – those clauses will not be enforceable.

 

Continue Reading

Unfair Dismissal

adrian_fryer

Is a dismissal unfair if the employer changes an investigation report following advice from an in-house lawyer? Not in this case, said the Employment Appeal Tribunal in Dronsfield v The University of Reading. The employee was a professor who had a sexual relationship with a student. University rules said he could only be dismissed for immoral, scandalous or disgraceful conduct. The University investigated the allegations and produced a report. An in-house lawyer suggested some changes, including parts which were favourable to the employee.

 

Continue Reading

TUPE Transfers and ‘Workers’

Adrian Fryer

Adrian Fryer

The worker status debate leached into the TUPE sphere towards the end of 2019. A ‘worker’ is defined by section 230(3) of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA) as:

An individual who…works under:

  1. A contract of employment, or
  2. Any other contract…where the individual undertakes to do or perform personally any work…for another party who…is not…a client or customer of…the individual.
Continue Reading

Sign up for Bermans Newsletters